What Critics Say About ‘Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhaniya’!

Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhaniya is produced by Karan Johar and it stars Varun Dhawan and Aalia Bhatt in lead roles. The movie opened to good box office numbers today. And now it’s time to check out the critics reviews. The movie has got average to good reviews from critics. Let’s take a look at the critics reviews below.

Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhaniya movie poster ft. Varun Dhawan & Aalia Bhatt

Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhaniya movie poster ft. Varun Dhawan & Aalia Bhatt

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Mixed Reviews For Ek Villain Ft. Sidharth Malhotra & Shraddha Kapoor!

Mohit Suri’s ‘Ek Villain’ starring Sidharth Malhotra, Shraddha Kapoor and Riteish Deshmukh has opened to excellent box office numbers today. But what about the reviews? Are the critics kind to the movie? Let’s find out.

Ek Villain received mixed to above average reviews from critics. Take a look at couple of reviews from mainstream reviewers below.

Ek Villain movie poster ft. Sidharth Malhotra, Shraddha Kapoor and Riteish Deshmukh

Ek Villain movie poster ft. Sidharth Malhotra, Shraddha Kapoor and Riteish Deshmukh

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Kangana Ranaut Is Getting Rave Reviews For ‘Queen’!

Kangna Ranaut must be in cloud 9 as the actress is getting high praise for her endearing performance in Queen from all quarters – be it reviewers, general public or Bollywood celebrities. Few celebrities took to twitter to convey their admiration for her award worthy performance in the movie. Let’s take a look at few tweets below!

Shekhar Kapur: ‘Queen has a fresh golden heart, at the centre of which lies a fluid consistent n convincing performance by Kangana Raut. Watch this one.’

 

Kangna Ranaut In Queen

Kangna Ranaut In Queen

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Highway Critics Reviews – Alia Bhatt Is Applauded By All!

Though Highway reviews are mixed to very good, Alia Bhatt is getting all the praise. It’s a great feat for Alia since it is only her 2nd film after 2012′s Student Of The Year. She was just a glam doll in Student Of The Year but she has done very well in Highway. Imtiaz Ali is known for his strong roles written for female characters (Kareena’s Geet from Jab We Met is still considered as one of the best female characters ever in Bollywood).

Alia Bhatt in Highway

Alia Bhatt in Highway

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Hasee Toh Phasee Is Getting Good Reviews!

This Friday release Hasee Toh Phasee, produced jointly by Anurag Kashyap and Karan Johar, is getting very good reviews so far. The viewers also have given thumbs up for the movie starring Sidharth Malhotra and Parineeti Chopra if the twitter reception is anything to go by. The movie has already got released in UAE and the response is very positive. Reviewers say in unison that it’s a well made romantic family drama. They also noted that the movie is unlike the less than impressive trailer and promos. Reviewers have appreciated the acting of Sidharth Malhotra and Parineeti Chopra. And their chemistry is also appreciated.

Hasee Toh Phasee

Hasee Toh Phasee

Filmfare review says (they gave 4 stars), “‘Opposites attract’ is probably the oldest and most clichéd saying in the book. But it holds true for almost all epic love stories. Hasee Toh Phasee falls in that category too. But this film is nothing close to a cliché. This quirky rom-com is packed with chaos, drama and ample laughs. And its USP lies in the vibe and chemistry that the lead actors share, making it likable and a very attractive young romance. The final verdict: HTP is one of the most refreshing boy-meets-girl films to have been made in recent times. So go watch this zany, new-age date movie. This is one date you won’t regret.”

Aniruddha Guha gave 3.5 stars, his review says, “The best romantic comedy made in Bollywood continues to be Shakun Batra’s Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu, which relentlessly stayed away from Hindi film clichés right till the end. Hasee Toh Phasee panders to mainstream constraints occasionally, but comes a close second to that film. It’s heart-warming, funny and enjoyable. And it touches a chord.”

IndiaToday gave 3 stars, their review says, “HTP is laced with hilarious situations and there are many laugh out loud moments which keep you entertained throughout this over two-hour-twenty-one minutes long film. It threatens to get slightly melodramatic in the second half but quickly saves itself from a deja vu pit. The well-written film is breezy, funny, witty, a fast-paced story, packed with crackling dialogue. Hasee Toh Phasee could be your best bet at cinemas this week.”

So, when are you watching the film?

Jai Ho Early Movie Reviews Are Out!

Dubai has just seen the premiere of Salman Khan’s much awaited film Jai Ho, directed by brother Sohail Khan and co-starring Tabu, Daisy Shah, Sana Khan & Santosh Shukla. The early reviews of this action film have started pouring in. As of now, the reviews are mixed. Let’s take a look at those reviews.

Indiatv was the first to post a review. They gave a very positive review; their review said, “Since we have Salman, then not expecting some bone crunching, face smashing action sequences will be unwise. Sohail wastes no
time whatsoever to bring in the combative progression and Salman enjoys every bit of it. Jai Ho is a sure shot entertainer, which has a genuine message at last. Go for it and surely go to help the deprived ones.”

Jai Ho poster ft. Salman Khan

Jai Ho poster ft. Salman Khan

Mensxp gave a 4 star review. Their review said, “The concept of the movie is provocative and it has none other than Salman Khan to ensure that you make your way to the theatres. Jai Ho is a movie that deserves your attention to the fullest, and equally demands your applause. It has the necessary strong fondness, which is thought provoking, and doesn’t mocks over the sentiments. Music by Sajid-Wajid is good and background score by Sandeep Shirodkar is brilliant. Jai Ho is a sure shot entertainer, with a genuine strong message. A must watch.”

However, bollywood.celebden gave a not so positive review. In their review they said, “So while there is much talk about who is it that will win in the box office race to 250 crores… our beloved bollywood fraternity seems to have forgotten the key element of what makes a good movie… a good movie!! 250 crores, or 100 crores of whatever it collects… I sincerely wish that people who have the ability to influence so many and entertain even more apply themselves better to create something that will do us proud, and stand the test of time. Not cater to cheap thrills and remix the same old formulae again and again. I am a big salman khan fan. He is a character unlike any we see in today’s bollywood. In many ways his life is very much like a movie itself. But I feel its time that even he should consider doing a good movie… and not a movie for the masses.”

So, are you excited to see the movie after reading these reviews?

R… Rajkumar Gets Mostly Negative Reviews!

Prabhu Deva’s 3rd Hindi directorial (after the very successful Wanted and Rowdy Rathore) R… Rajkumar starring Shahid Kapoor and Sonakshi Sinha received overwhelming negative response from critics. Usually critics don’t give good reviews to masala action flicks. However, they usually give an average rating of 2 or 2.5 stars on 5 to such films. But for this film, most reviewers stuck to a 1 or 1.5 or even less. Box office analyst Taran Adarsh usually gives good review to most of the films but he also has given a negative review. It seems like this movie irked the sensibilities of many reviewers.

Noted critic Rajeeva Masand tweeted, “In a scene in R…Rajkumar, a cop is raping a woman in a jail cell when he’s interrupted by an urgent phone call. How is this entertainment?”

R.. Rajkumar ft. Shahid Kapoor and Sonakshi Sinha

R.. Rajkumar ft. Shahid Kapoor and Sonakshi Sinha

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CHASHME BADDOOR Movie Review

Reviewed By Anna M.M. Vetticad

Release date:April 5, 2013
Director:David Dhawan
Cast:Language:Ali Zafar, Siddharth, Divyendu Sharma, Taapsee Pannu, Anupam Kher, Bharati Achrekar, Rishi Kapoor, Lillette Dubey
Hindi

 

chashme baddoor 2012 movie poster ft. Ali Zafar, Siddharth, Divyendu Sharma & Taapsee Pannu 02

chashme baddoor 2012 movie poster ft. Ali Zafar, Siddharth, Divyendu Sharma & Taapsee Pannu 02

There are two ways you can watch this film. You could either hark back to Sai Paranjpye’s Chashme Buddoor starring Farooque Shaikh and Deepti Naval, and feel traumatised that this remake is not a patch on the comparatively mellow drama of the original. Or you could forget that this is a remake, and take it for what it is: a flawed yet fun film and a vast improvement on the shrill, crude comedies we’re more used to getting from contemporary Bollywood.

Chashme Baddoor 2013 pretty much sticks to the plot of the original film. Jai and Omi are skirt-chasers who share a flat with their level-headed friend Sid. While pursuing a pretty girl called Seema, the two no-gooders are humiliated by her family. So when Sid and Seema fall in love, Jai and Omi plot to keep them apart. Hence the song: Har ek friend kamina hota hai.

Director David Dhawan won half his battle with this film when his casting director got Pakistani actor Ali Zafar, south Indian star Siddharth and the one-Bollywood-film-old Divyendu Sharma to play Sid, Jai and Omi respectively. The three have such a likeable screen presence that it becomes easier to forgive the film its many flaws. Besides, Zafar’s Hindi diction is so sexy that it makes you want to curse the asses who partitioned India in 1947. It helps that he’s cute as a button, as are his co-stars in a very relaxed, non-in-your-face, not-flashing-bulging-biceps-or-tiny-waistlines-at-us kind of way. Divyendu carries forward the smooth dialogue delivery that made him so noticeable in Pyaar ka Punchnama despite the misogyny that ruled that filmAnd Telugu-Tamil actress Taapsee Pannu is a pleasant presence as Seema who never once raises the decibel level of the film despite instances where a lesser actress might have done so.

Bringing up the rear are veteran Anupam Kher clearly having a lark in a double role as Seema’s Armyman dad and Army-hating uncle, with the ever-dependable Bharti Achrekar as their mother who’s prone to slapping annoying people. Rishi Kapoor plays local café owner Joseph, and Lillette Dubey is the boys’ landlady Miss Josephine. The two do their best despite the lackadaisical writing and direction of scenes in which they interact.

Which brings us to my big issue with Chashme Baddoor… Why do so many Bollywood comedy writers these days fill their pages with rhyming dialogues, puns and self-referential jokes? And by that I’m not referring to Omi’s shayari (which is enjoyably kitschy and tacky for the most part), but the manner in which Jai and Omi constantly rhyme their sentences even when Omi is not spouting poetry. They are not alone. Josephine, when told that Joseph is an alcoholic, says: Life mein hamara support mila toh woh alcohol ko deport kar dega. Noooooo!!!!! Talk about genre clichés … whether it’s Salman Khan in Ready or for that matter all the characters in most Dhawan, Anees Bazmee and Indra Kumar films these days, THEY’RE ALL RHYMING WORDS! Why?! Fortunately, these tedious patches are balanced out by many genuinely funny scenes, which makes Chashme Baddoor work overall for a tolerant person like me.

What’s not tolerable though are the ageist bits that can’t be excused simply because we’ve seen far worse from Bollywood. It’s not okay for a young man to refer to an old lady as a “khandahar”. It’s not okay either that Jai tells Seema’s grandmom: Marne ki umar chalee gayee lekin aap abhi bhi Queenfisher ki model lagti ho. There are also just too many songs unthinkingly inserted into the plot as though a pre-determined template demanded a song after every x minutes. Andha ghoda race mein dauda is decidedly dull, but compensation comes in the form of the light-hearted lyrics and melody of Dhichkyaoon dhum dhum, the peppy Har ek friend kamina hota hai and the retro mood of Uski aankhon mein toh saji hai madhusala.

The editor seems to have gone missing in certain scenes where awkward silences of a few seconds needed to be shaved off but weren’t, almost as though it wasn’t worth the effort. Arrey! Those not familiar with scenic Goa (where this film is set) may not be irked by this, but it annoyed me that characters seemingly living in Panaji were shown attending church services in Old Goa… a bit like showing residents of Mumbai’s Andheri buying daily groceries in Worli or CP residents in Delhi driving to Ghaziabad for a manicure. Were churches in Panaji unavailable for shooting? This spot of laziness and the lack of locational specificity in the film are exacerbated by memories of the charming referencing of Delhi in the 1981 Chashme Buddoor.

I guess since Dhawan wants us to ignore logic while watching his films, there’s no point asking why the boys in this Chashme Baddoor intermittently dish out imitations of legendary actors in passing or the reasoning behind the switch to a retro look in places. What the heck, since I enjoyed those parts (particularly Siddharth’s take on Amrish Puri’s voice) I won’t complain too much. So here’s the final word: Chashme Baddoor is not of an unequivocally hilarious standard like David Dhawan’s Govinda-starrer Hero No. 1 or the madcap Biwi No. 1 with Salman and Karisma; yet the director is in way better form here than in his more recent Govinda-starrer Do Knot Disturb which was so flat that it was tragic. True, Dhawan’s Chashme Baddoor is a far cry from Sai Paranjpye’s film, but when viewed in the context of contemporary Bollywood comedy, it must be said that it’s also a far cry from the offensiveness of Sajid Khan’s Housefull 2,the crassness of Sachin Yardi’s Kyaa Superkool Hain Hum, the loudness of Dhawan’s own Rascals and the unfunny-ness of Khan’s HimmatwalaChashme Baddoor is a spot of mindless fun and for all its flaws, I had a good time watching it.

Rating (out of five): **3/4

CBFC Rating (India):U/A
Running time:131 minutes

Anna M.M. Vetticad is a renowned media person and reviewer who has been working for various media for the last 17 years. You can read more reviews by Anna on her blog. You can also send your feedback directly to Anna at her twitter id: @annavetticad

RANGREZZ Movie Review

Reviewed by Anna M.M. Vetticad

Release date:
March 21, 2013
Director:
Priyadarshan
Cast:
 
Language:
Jackky Bhagnani, Amitosh Nagpal, Vijay Verma, Priya Anand, Raghav Chanana, Akshara Gowda, Rajpal Yadav, Pankaj Tripathi, Lushin Dubey
Hindi

 

Rangrezz 2013 Bollywood Hindi movie fist look poster ft. Jackky Bhagnani

Rangrezz 2013 Bollywood Hindi movie fist look poster ft. Jackky Bhagnani

I have to confess I enjoyed watching Rangrezz for the most part. Sometimes though, the message a film sends out in the final few minutes can be so offensive, so disturbing and so objectionable that all the good direction, slick action and beautiful music that came before is simply dwarfed.

Rangrezz is the story of three friends who decide to help a fourth friend elope with his lover since her father is dead against the relationship. Rishi (Jackky Bhagnani), Pakiya (Vijay Verma) and Vinu (Amitosh Nagpal) risk life, limb and family to bring Joy (Raghav Chanana) and Jasmine (Akshara Gowda) together in one of the most brilliantly executed, breath-stopping action sequences I’ve ever seen in a Hindi film. The introduction to all the characters is reasonable fun (even if it’s amusing to see two songs stuffed into the proceedings to blatantly provide the producer’s son Jackky with a platform for his dancing skills); the several-minutes-long elopement sequence dramatically turns the tone of the film; there’s a completely unexpected and intriguing twist in the tale in the second half (unexpected if you’ve not seen the original Tamil film Naadodigal on whichRangrezz is based); and then come the two speeches in the last half hour that could have been dubbed laughable if they weren’t dangerous, considering our Indian social reality.

You see, the entire point of Rangrezz is to preach to us that pig-headed parents are completely justified in preventing children from choosing their own life partners because, well, young people are too irresponsible, hormonally driven and sexually obsessed to be taken seriously in such matters. This lesson delivered to us by Jackky’s Rishi is completely at odds with the support he lends to his own sister and her boyfriend … but let not logic come in the way of a solid Bollywood bhaashan.

The sermonising drivel doled out in the end spoils the impact of what is otherwise a rather entertaining film. Jackky may lack screen presence but it’s only fair to say that his acting has been steadily improving since he made his debut with Kal Kissne Dekha four years back. Besides, Bhagnani Senior has had the good sense here not to saddle his son with a solo hero film as he did with KKD and last year’s Ajab Gazabb Love. InRangrezz, as with 2011’s Faltu, Jackky shares screen space with a bunch of talented co-stars (barring Rajpal Yadav who is painfully repetitive and Lushin Dubey who over-acts) and comes off not-too-badly as a consequence. Sure he gets to strip off his shirt to show off his abs within seconds after the start of the film, and yes Vinu and Pakiya are ignored in the film’s song-and-dance sequences, but we shall grant an indulgent daddy this much. All is forgiven since he had the courage to cast the highly talented Chandan Roy Sanyal as Jackky’s buddy in Faltu, and here he gives us the attractive and charismatic Vijay Verma as Rishi’s hot-headed friend Pakiya and the nicely understated Amitosh Nagpal as the more level-headed Vinu.

Full marks to the film’s editor T.S. Suresh for his handling of the elopement sequence and to singer Sukhwinder for his thumping rendition of Shambho Shiv Shambho during that scene. In the midst of all this praise, it must also be said that director Priyadarshan does not know when to stop if he’s got a good thing going – it’s perfectly acceptable to show a person being injured in a gruesome battle, but what purpose is served by then also showing us close-ups of needle and thread being put to a deep gash on a man’s forehead? Thankfully, these gratuitous moments in Rangrezz are not many. Later in the film, Shambho Shiv Shambho is used again and, not surprisingly, is far less effective than the first time – not only because of over-use but because by then we have already been lectured once about justifications for parental despotism. As for the Gangnam Style video in the end featuring Jackky – it’s a poor revision of Psy’s original that is still notching up millions of hits on youtube.

This review would be incomplete without singling out Rangrezz’s cinematographer Santosh Sivan for capturing rural India in a way that Bollywood rarely does. The film is filled with lovely shots of the countryside, epitomised by one particularly mesmerising tree that spreads out like a protective, gigantic umbrella over our protagonists. Neatly tucked into the film right before its shocking moral-science class is also a very nice point being made to parents about how a child’s choice of marital partner should not be based on caste and class. Odd, is it not, that what follows is absolution for parents who oppose their children’s right to pick a husband or wife?

With much to recommend in it despite its flaws, it’s a crying shame that the ultimate message being sent out by Rangrezz makes it an advertisement for extreme conservatism. I can quite imagine khap panchayats paying big money to Priyadarshan to make versions of this film in other languages. A crying shame indeed!

Rating (out of five): **3/4

CBFC Rating (India):U/A
Running time:143 minutes

Anna M.M. Vetticad is a renowned media person and reviewer who has been working for various media for the last 17 years. You can read more reviews by Anna on her blog. You can also send your feedback directly to Anna at her twitter id: @annavetticad

AATMA Movie Review

Reviewed by Anna M.M. Vetticad

Release date:
March 22, 2013
Director:
Suparn Verma
Cast:
 
 

Language:
Bipasha Basu, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Doyel Dhawan, Shernaz Patel, Mohan Kapur, Tilottama Shome, Darshan Jariwala, Jaideep Ahlawat
Hindi
Aatma 2013 Bollywood Hindi movie poster ft. Bipasha Basu & Nawazuddin Siddique

Aatma 2013 Bollywood Hindi movie poster ft. Bipasha Basu & Nawazuddin Siddique

A woman divorces her physically abusive husband. The man dies shortly afterwards, returning as a spirit to haunt his wife and reclaim their child. That, in a nutshell, is the story of Aatma. Writer-director Suparn Verma’s film begins with the promise of a layered and poignant tale of domestic violence, a self-respecting woman who brooks no abuse and the things human beings do when relationships sour. This is the direction the film takes in the first half, while steering clear of most Bollywood ghost story clichés. Yes, the background score is actually not screechy, there’s barely any blood, and no one, but no one, flies in the air.

Sadly, predictability sets in in the second half. After a while you can tell from a mile who the spook will target next. By the time the climax (or rather, anti-climax) comes around, it’s clear the screenplay has failed to move beyond the potential of the original concept. As things stand, there are elements worth strongly recommending in Aatma, but they simply do not all add up.

Element No. 1: Bipasha Basu is in fine form here as Maya Verma, a woman who takes a broken marriage in her stride but begins to unravel at the prospect of the loss of her child. It’s also a pleasant change to see Bipasha in a film that presents her as a natural beauty with minimal makeup and without the aid of killer gowns or bikinis, just as any great-looking female professional might be. Doyel Dhawan is charming as little Niya and impresses with her acting skills, especially in the scene in which she sees her father’s true colours.

However, it’s a crime to cast Nawazuddin Siddiqui in a film and then give him the most poorly written part of the lot. Siddiqui plays Maya’s dead husband Abhay. What were this man’s motivations? What prompted those fits of rage and the depth of hatred for his wife? We never get to know. Still, we do get glimpses of Siddiqui’s phenomenal talent in a spooky scene involving a bathroom and a schoolteacher, and elsewhere, in the only scene that gives him the canvas he deserves, when the judge awards custody of Niya to Maya causing Abhay to explode with rage. Another actor who gets shortchanged by the writing is the wonderful Jaideep Ahlawat as a policeman investigating a string of crimes, all of them with links to Niya.

There are several points where it seems like Aatma may head in an interesting direction, but then the writer holds back. There’s a neatly executed scene in which Ahlawat’s policeman has a dream which seems to suggest that he’s getting far more involved in the case than he should be. Where did that come from? What happens thereafter? No answers. Elsewhere, Maya is told that the only way Abhay will manage to take Niya away from her is if a wedge is driven between her and the child. Why is that not carried forward? Again, no answers.

Where you can’t fault Aatma is in the departments of cinematography and production design which lend an unrelentingly eerie atmosphere to the film even when the story goes downhill. Sophie Winqvist’s camera seems to stand beside the ghost at some points observing his prey, and sometimes next to us observing them all. Sometimes it goes to floor level watching a woman walk to her death, sometimes it peers down from the balcony of a high-rise building, sometimes it watches the backs of the characters through most of a scene, sometimes it is far, sometimes it is close, and always always it’s lovely. Production designer Sukant Panigrahy complements Winqvist’s work with colours and disturbing settings that seem born to host a ghost.

The effect is particularly striking in Aatma’s two most frightening and most well-conceived scenes: one involving that aforementioned bathroom and schoolteacher, the other featuring a Hindu priest. There are other scarey moments in the film, but since they’re mostly concentrated in the first half, the impact peters out post-interval.

In the end, Aatma simply leaves you with a sense of what might have been. It might have been that much-needed Bollywood film about spousal abuse and the challenges an assertive woman faces in today’s world; it might have been the story of what loneliness and loss can do to a little child; it might have been about the pain that divorce visits on a child and the politics an evil parent can play; it might have taken us into the mind of a violent husband. The ghost could have been a metaphor here for the horrors in an ailing marriage. The supernatural angle could have been just a clever device to tell a larger story about relationships, the way Reema Kagti’s recent Talaash used the genre to show us a marriage torn apart by the trauma of the death of a child while simultaneously discussing society’s indifference to those who live on its margins.

Could have been… Might have been… Is not… Despite a good start and some truly alluring individual elements, Aatma disappoints.

Rating (out of five): **1/2
 
CBFC Rating (India):              A
Running time:                           95 minutes
Anna M.M. Vetticad is a renowned media person and reviewer who has been working for various media for the last 17 years. You can read more reviews by Anna on her blog. You can also send your feedback directly to Anna at her twitter id: @annavetticad